Search

Truth in Palmyra

By Wally Fry

Category

Genesis

Esau’s Descendants, Genesis 36

After a short hiatus, we are now resuming our following of this study in Genesis by KD Manes. Blessings and enjoy.

jordan

Oholibamah. Try saying that 10 times fast! Who was Oholibamah? She was one of two Hittite women that Esau—Jacob’s twin brother—married according to Genesis 36.

Even though intermarriage with the Canaanites was strictly forbidden by his family, Esau defies his parents’ religious principles when he marries two idolatrous Hittites. Isaac and Rebekah are miserable with this arrangement (26:35). So Esau decides to add a third wife. But this time he’d marry Basemath, an Ishmael descendant (28:9).

You may read the list of Esau’s descendants here: Bible Gateway……read the rest of the post here: Esau’s Descendants, Genesis 36

God Renews His Promise to Abram, Genesis 15:2-7

By: KD Manes

From: KDManestreet

After God promises Abram that He will be his shield and very great reward (Gen. 15:1), Abram voices his concern:

O Sovereign LORD, what can you give me since I remain childless and the one who will inherit my estate is Eliezer of Damascus? . . . .You have given me no children; so a servant in my household will be my heir,” (Gen. 15:2-3).

You may read Genesis 15:1-7 here: Bible Gateway.

The custom in that day held that if Abram died without a son, his oldest servant would become his heir. Even though Abram valued Eliezer, his chief administrator (Gen. 24), he yearned for a son to carry on the family line. And his nephew, Lot—with no record of appreciation for Abram saving his life—had returned to Sodom.

God’s promise of many descendants didn’t align with Abram’s present reality.

But our God—being the God of the impossible—reminded Abram that his son would come from his own body.

Once again, God confirms His promise to Abram (12:2; 13:15-16).

God Credits Abram with Righteousness

Abram’s response in Genesis 15:6 is considered by some to be the most important verse in the Old Testament: “Abram believed the LORD, and He credited [or imputed] it to him as righteousness.”

For the first time, the principle of true salvation is set forth in the Bible. The New Testament not only confirms salvation by faith, but also sets Abraham as a type of all who would be saved (Rom. 4:3; Gal. 3:6; James 2:23).

God declared Abram clean and morally right—righteous—not from his outward actions of obedience and/or works, (although these are by-products of faith), but rather on the basis of his faith.

In Noah’s case, ‘grace’ comes before ‘righteousness’; in Abram’s case, ‘faith’ comes before ‘righteousness.’ The one stresses God’s sovereignty, the other man’s responsibility. Both are true and necessary. ‘By grace are ye saved through faith. . . . For we are His workmanship, created in Christ Jesus unto good works” (Eph. 2:8, 10).  – Henry Morris, The Genesis Record

Reflect

  • There are many times when we can’t see God’s big picture for our lives, but He is constantly working to accomplish His purposes. “In all things He works for the good of those who love Him (Rom. 8:28).”
  • God has always yearned for His people to trust Him: to believe He is who He says He is and does what He says He will do.
  • Today, we live under God’s new covenant: God graciously provides forgiveness of our sins and gives salvation (unto righteousness) through faith in His Son, Jesus Christ, because of His atoning sacrifice on the cross.
  • Have you taken this step of faith? (For more on salvation and righteousness

View the original post here on KDManestreet

Does Archaeology Support the Bible?

By: KD Manes

From: KDManestreet

Over and over again the Bible has been vindicated from Genesis to Revelation. The superiority of Genesis 1–11 has been established, and the patriarchal backgrounds have been endorsed.”  – Clifford Wilson

Before moving on to The Abrahamic Covenant, Genesis 14-17, I thought it would be interesting to investigate archaeology discoveries that confirm the account of Genesis. Although I believe the Bible is God’s revealed Word and that God doesn’t need further proof of His truth, archaeology is a great tool for understanding Bible history and growing one’s confidence in the accuracy of biblical accounts.

Henry Morris in The Genesis Record writes: “It is significant that these excavations do not show primitive, half-bestial cultures, newly evolved from an animal ancestry, but high civilization, exactly as suggested in Genesis. . . . Not only did the ‘intelligentsia’ of Ur know how to read and write long before the time of Abraham, but so did even the ordinary citizens. When Abraham lived there, Ur had already begun to decline somewhat from a former glory.”

Although the exact chronology of Genesis 11 is uncertain, there is ample archaeological evidence that suggests the names and events in Genesis are not just legendary Jewish heroes and places, but were real people and places.

Clifford Wilson in “Does Archaeology Support the Bible?” writes: “Archaeologists are scholars, usually academics with interest in the Bible as an occasional source book. A substantial number of scholarly archaeologists are committed Christians, but they are a minority. Many people believe that all archaeologists set out to verify biblical history, but that is not the case. Many excavators have virtually no interest in the Bible, but there are notable exceptions.”

Dead Sea Scrolls

“Where confirmation is possible and has come to light, the Bible survives careful investigation in ways that are unique in all literature. Its superiority to attack, its capacity to withstand criticism, and its amazing facility to be proved right are all staggering by any standards of scholarship. Seemingly assured results ‘disproving’ the Bible have a habit of backfiring.”

“The more this new science of archaeology touches the records of the Bible, the more we are convinced that it is a unique record. At many points it is greatly superior to other writings left by neighboring people.”

Clifford Wilson’s article may be found at this link: Does Archaeology Support the Bible? It’s long, but an interesting read. Wilson delves into three major evidences for each of the following biblical accounts:

  • Genesis 1–11, 11-36, 37-50
  • Exodus to Deuteronomy
  • Joshua to Saul
  • David to Solomon
  • the Assyrian Period
  • the Babylonians and Nebuchadnezzar
  • Cyrus and the Medes and Persians
  • Ezra and Nehemiah
  • the Dead Sea Scrolls
  • the Person of Our Lord Jesus
  • the New Testament, the Early Church, and the Early Years of Christianity

Read the original post here on KDManestreet

Abram’s Third Revelation, Genesis 13:14-18

By KD Manes

From KDManestreet

Lift up your eyes from where you are and look north and south, east and west. All the land that you see I will give to you and your offspring forever. I will make your offspring like the dust of the earth, so that if anyone could count the dust, then your offspring could be counted. Go, walk through the length and breadth of the land, for I am giving it to you.” – Genesis 13:14-17

This is the second part from last week’s post, Abram and Lot Separate.

*****

The idea of walking through the land (vs. 17) appears to be symbolic. Armies in the ancient Near East declared their victory by marching through a defeated territory.

Layman’s Bible Commentary makes three observations about God’s third revelation to Abram:

  1. God will give the land to Abram and his descendants forever.
  2. Abram’s heir will be his own child.
  3. Abram’s descendants will be innumerable.

These promises were great news for Abram, especially 3a6bfc15a12e519590af3c1b7018482eas Lot parted east toward the more fertile plain of Jordan and Abram headed back into the hill country of Canaan. The reality of God’s promises, however, would not come into fruition for a long time.

For neither Abram, nor his descendants (especially the promised seed Isaac) owned the land for most of history. And although Israel regained possession as a nation in 1948, they currently possess only a fraction of the land God has promised.

The Land of Canaan

Of the promise of the land, Henry Morris in The Genesis Record notes: “This promise must either be taken in the spiritual sense (applying it to a spiritual land of promise, as so interpreted by many expositors) or else ascribed to a time yet future. Since God promised the land to Abram and his seed forever, this can ultimately, if taken literally be fulfilled only in the new earth of Revelation 21. It will quite probably be fulfilled precursively, however, during the coming millennial age.”

Innumerable Descendants

Along with the Jews, Abram’s descendants include the Arabs. Although these two groups add up to a large number, the literal promise of Abram’s seed numbering “as the dust of the earth” and Abram becoming a great nation still awaits fulfillment.

Morris observes: “The New Testament makes it clear that ‘Abram’s seed’ was Christ Himself (Gal. 3:16), and that Abram is ‘father of all them that believe’ (Rom. 4:11), so that he also has a spiritual seed. It is evidently not a case of either this or that, but of both! The Jewish nation is to be eternally blessed as a nation, chosen of God in Abram. Likewise, the Christian Church, genuine believers in Christ from all nations, is itself a ‘holy nation’ (1 Peter 2:9), ‘Abraham’s seed, and heirs according to the promise’ (Galatians 3:29). Abram indeed was to be the ‘father of many nations’ (Gen. 17:5).”

Chapter 13 ends with Abram building another altar where he makes his home base in Hebron (18:1), which means “communion.” This is also where he is later buried (25:9).

Read the original post here on KDManestreeet

Abram in Egypt, Genesis 12:10-20

By: KD Manes

From: KDManestreet

I hope you are enjoying summer. Despite lingering smoke from lots of wildfires here in the northwest, our family has enjoyed a full summer of sports, outdoor activities, and good times with family and friends. We recently celebrated my parents’ 50th wedding anniversary. Congratulations Dad & Mom! And Happy 49th Anniversary to my second parents (in-laws)! We are blessed to have godly examples in our lives.

This is the second part to last week’s post, Abram’s Call, Genesis 1-9. In summary, Abram obeys God by journeying to Canaan (Shechem). He then sets up camp between Ai and Bethel where he worships God. But when a severe famine strikes, Abram detours to Egypt: a land of plenty for both food and good land for his flocks.

You may read Genesis 12:10-20 here: Bible Gateway

Why would God call Abram to a land of famine?

Commentators say this was a test of Abram’s faith, which Abram passed with flying colors. Instead of questioning God in the face of difficulty, he used his intelligence to temporarily move and wait for new opportunities.

However, verses 10-20 sound more like an ancient soap opera. We glimpse a crack in Abram’s shield of faith and see he is human after all.

In fear of Pharoah noticing Sarai’s beauty (his wife)—and killing Abram—he devises a half-lie. Seventy-five year old Abram instructs Sarai, who is also his half-sister, to say she is only his sister if questioned. Beauty in those days was viewed differently than in our time and culture.

Medieval commentators suggest that what Abram hopes to get out of being Sarai’s brother is the right to receive and deny all suitors’ requests to be Sarai’s husband, in this way protecting her from adultery or bigamy. However, Abram is also acting in fear to save his life.

As if on cue, Pharoah does notice Sarai and takes her into his household. He also showers Abram with provisions of gifts: sheep, cattle, donkeys, camels, menservants and maidservants (12:15-16).

However, this arrangement is short lived. God inflicts Pharoah and his household with serious diseases. After pinpointing when and where his troubles began, Pharoah summons Abram and confronts him with the truth. For absolute truthfulness was a central feature of Egyptian ethics.

(Source: theBibleproject.com) Genesis 13:1,

Abram appears to get away scott-free as Pharoah sends Abram, Sarai, and all their gifts away with just a scolding. But Layman’s Commentary Bible observes: “Everything Abram receives in Egypt later causes him trouble. Because of the great wealth he acquires from Pharaoh, Abram and Lot choose to separate (13:5-6). Hagar, the Egyptian maidservant who Pharaoh gives to Abram, brings division and sorrow with far-reaching consequences (16:1-16).”

Food For Thought

  • Have you ever told a half-lie only to find it spiral out of control? I’ve found that half-lies usually make matters worse.
  • “Faith is holding on to things your reason has once accepted in spite of your changing moods.”  – C.S. Lewis

Next week I’ll pick up on Genesis 13, Abram and Lot Separate. Have a great week!

Read the original post here

Image: The Bible Project

Abram’s Call, Genesis 12:1-9

By: KD Manes

From: KDManestreet Blog

The LORD had said to Abram, “Leave your country, your people and your father’s household and go to the land I will show you. I will make you into a great nation and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all peoples on earth will be blessed through you.”                            Genesis 12:1-3

I broke Genesis 12 into two posts since this was getting long. This first part tells of Abram’s journey to Shechem in Canaan. Next week’s post will be about Abram’s detour to Egypt due to famine in the land, Genesis 12:10-20.

You may read Genesis 12:1-9 here: Bible Gateway.

Genesis 12:1-3 unveils God’s covenant with Abram. God promises a great blessing to Abram. He would create a special nation through Abram’s offspring, but there is one condition: Abram would have to obey and leave the comfort and security of his home.

In Genesis 12:1 the word “had” suggests that God’s message to Abram happened in Ur, even though 11:31 ends with Abram in Haran. Abram respected his father’s leadership, but after Terah died Abram obeys and sets out for the land of Canaan. Lot probably also believed God’s promises since he voluntarily went with Abram.

The original Hebrew wording “you will be a blessing” in verse 2 means, “Be a blessing.” Not only would God bless Israel—the nation God would craft from Abram’s family—but they would also bless the other nations. Israel was to be set apart, follow God, and influence those around her.

Through Abram’s family tree, Jesus Christ was born to save all people. Jesus also made a personal relationship with God possible.

Abram Worships God                                                                                                 

5751352_f520

Abram stops at Shechem (12:6-7), near the middle of Canaan (Joshua 20:7), where the LORD appears to him a second time. Again, God promises to give this land to Abram’s offspring. Abram responds with worship and builds an altar.

Layman’s Commentary Bible notes: “The word translated worship carries the idea of not only acknowledging, but also proclaiming the name of the Lord.”

Abram Camps Between Ai and Bethel

Abram heads out again. This time he and his group camp in the hills east of Bethel (12:8) as Abram continues worshiping  God.

Biblos.com

So What?

  • Is God leading you to a place of greater service and usefulness to Him? Like Abram, don’t let your present comfort and security keep you from God’s plan.
  • Regular worship reminds us of what God desires and motivates us to obey.
  • Although geographically small, the land of Canaan was the main area for most of Israel’s history. Not only are Christianity’s roots from here, but Christianity has spread and positively impacted the world.
  • America has been richly blessed as our forefathers and people honored God and sought to live by His principles, including the support of Israel. But when we as a nation turn our backs on God and His teaching we are inviting His judgment.

Read the original post here

The Tower of Babel, Genesis 11:1-9

By KD Manes at KDManestreet

Again, another Friday installment of this great study on the Book of Genesis


Now the whole world had one language and a common speech. As men moved eastward, they found a plain in Shinar and settled there. They said to each other, “Come, let’s make bricks and bake them thoroughly.” They used brick instead of stone, and tar for mortar. Then they said, “Come let us build ourselves a city, with a tower that reaches to the heavens, so that we may make a name for ourselves and not be scattered over the face of the whole earth.”  – Genesis 11:1-4

This incident happens before the worldwide scatter of nations described in Genesis 10. You may read Genesis 11:1-9 here: Gateway Bible.

Why Build a Tower?

The Building of the Tower of Babel, by Abel Grimmer (1570-1619)

The people in this story wanted to pay tribute to their own greatness. The NIV Life Application Study Bible notes: “The tower of Babel was most likely a ziggurat, a common structure in Babylonia at this time. Most often built as temples, ziggurats looked like pyramids with steps or ramps leading up the sides. Ziggurats stood as high as 300 feet and were often just as wide; thus they were the focal point of the city.”

Although this tower was a success from man’s perspective—a wonder to the world—the act came from self-preservation and pride instead of paying tribute to God.

Why Scatter the people?

God judges the people for their rebellion: placing trust in their own efforts instead of His provision. The word Babel means “confusion” in Hebrew and “the gate of gods” in Babylonian. Instead of settling in one place, God scatters the people over the whole earth by confusing their language.

The language of verse 6 may sound like God is worried, however, He is not threatened by man’s words or actions. Instead, He acts to protect man from himself.

Other Interesting Facts

  • “But the LORD came down to see the city and the tower.” Verses 5-6 are described as anthropomorphic: a description of God’s response in human terms. God really doesn’t need to leave heaven to know what is happening on earth.
  • Verse 7, “let us”, refers to the Godhead (Trinity) by using the same plural form of God as in the creation account (Gen. 1:26).
  • The area later known as Babylon carries a reputation of evil and has a long history of being Israel’s enemy.
  • Josephus and Genesis Chapter 10 by Bodie Hodge gives an insightful summary and excerpt from the great historian, Josephus, in his work: Antiquity of the Jews. Josephus’ research provides evidence of biblical accuracy in the Bible’s table of nations. You may read this article here: Answers in Genesis.

Read the rest of this article here

Noah’s Sons, Genesis 9:18-28

It’s time for another installment of this great study on Genesis by KD Manes over at KDManestreet.

The sons of Noah who came out of the ark were Shem, Ham and Japheth, (Ham was the father of Canaan.) These were the three sons of Noah, and from them came the people who were scattered over the earth. Noah, a man of the soil, proceeded to plant a vineyard. When he drank some of its wine, he became drunk and lay uncovered inside his tent.” – Genesis 9:18-21

(You may read the entire section here: Gateway Bible.)

This section darkly contrasts to the previous section of God’s grace and colorful rainbow. It’s sad to find Noah—the great hero of faith—in this scenario. But perhaps this scene is included in Scripture as a reminder that even godly people can fall to sin and its disastrous consequences.

The word translated uncovered in this text means “to be disgracefully exposed.” Ham makes no attempt to preserve his Dad’s dignity when seeing him like this. In fact, some scholars say the verb used to describe Ham seeing Noah portrays a nasty punch: “He gazed with satisfaction”.

Unlike Ham’s bold delight in gloating over Noah’s shame, his brothers Shem and Japheth honor their Dad by walking in backwards and covering him. In doing so, they win Noah’s approval and God’s blessing (9:23). Japheth is blessed with an extended territory and a large number of descendants (9:26-27) for protecting Noah. Japheth would also find protection in Shem’s tents.

But not Ham.

When Noah learns of Ham’s actions, he curses Canaan (Ham’s son): “The lowest of slaves will he be to his brothers” (vs. 25). The NIV Life Application Study Bible notes: “This verse has been wrongfully used to support racial prejudice and slavery. Noah’s curse, however, wasn’t directed toward any particular race, but rather at the Canaanite nation—a nation God knew would become wicked.”

Verse 18, which speaks of Ham as Canaan’s father, was especially relevant to Moses’ original audience regarding Ham’s descendants. For it set the stage for the Israelite story under Moses’ leadership. The book of Joshua shows the fulfillment of this curse when the Israelites finally enter the promised land and drive out the Canaanites.

The end of chapter 9 records Noah’s lifetime after the flood, 350 years, and his total lifetime: 950 years

Read the original post here

Picture: Proverbs31Ministries.com

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: