Revelation 2:1-7

“I know thy works, and thy labour, and thy patience, and how thou canst not bear them which are evil: and thou hast tried them which say they are apostles, and are not, and hast found them liars: And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name’s sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted” Revelation 2:2-3

Well, here we are, still in the second verse; in reality, we are slipping into verse three briefly also. We may poke around here for a few posts. I suspect after Ephesus we may move through the others some quicker, as there may be some thoughts common to them all. I really don’t know yet!

Here we continue with Jesus’ commendations for this church; they are many. We just have some good things going in in the Church at Ephesus. They had been around for probably 40 years at the time of this writing, had worked out some issues, and were doing some great things.

Jesus knew their “labor.” This is more than just casual, half-hearted work for the Lord. The word here denotes not just routine work, but toil and effort to the point of exhaustion. It doesn’t look like there were a lot of pew warmers in the Ephesus Church; this local assembly was apparently taking the message from inside the church to the community of Ephesus in a tireless manner.

Jesus knew their “patience.” Here we see an allusion to hard work and patience in the face of what likely was difficult circumstances. The city of Ephesus was the epicenter for the worship of the goddess of fertility Diana(Artemis.) The worship of fertility gods and sexual immorality just go hand in hand. People would come to the temple of Artemis and engage in sexual immorality under the guise of worship. I am sure some didn’t really give two hoots about Artemis but were only looking to satisfy their own cravings with a ready-built excuse. Then, as now, nobody wants to hear that message, and it must have been received with some hostility. Yet, the church at Ephesus persevered. The church at Ephesus certainly caused the perception of economic uproar, as we can see in Acts 19, when the silversmith Demetrius stirred up a riot in town by claiming that the Christians were going to ruin their livelihood. It’s not a stretch here to think that perhaps the Christians in Ephesus were themselves pushed to the periphery of the economy, perhaps facing financial and economic struggles of their own. Yet, they persevered.

The Christians at Ephesus understood what their mission was, and for whom it was for. Jesus told them this, “And hast borne, and hast patience, and for my name’s sake hast laboured, and hast not fainted”vs 3. Even though their execution was not always perfect, they seem to have understood why they were there, and for whom, and worked tirelessly in difficult circumstances for the Kingdom.

Compared to our own day and time, when many would claim that to come to both Sunday School and preaching on the same day, there is a lot to find commendable in this church. Jesus said as much!

Next up, we will look at the pursuit of doctrinal purity in the Church at Ephesus, then most likely a short discussion of the infamous Nicolaitanes.

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